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From Harrisburg and Philly, news from the craft beer boom

From across the Commonwealth comes big news on the brewing front.

In Harrisburg, Zeroday Brewing Company cut the ribbon on its new space in the Midtown neighborhood. Husband-and-wife team Theo and Brandalynn Armstrong (Theo is the brewer; Brandalynn handles the business side) say the name Zeroday pays homage to a hiking term: it refers to a day spent exploring a town, off the trail.

"We want Harrisburg to be a zero day town," explains Theo. "It’s a place worth stopping and exploring."

The Armstrongs kicked off the project in 2013 with an official brand launch, corresponding crowdfunding campaign and guerilla-style pop-up events that allowed them to introduce community members and beer lovers to their suds.

On tap for opening day: Firstborn, a dry stout; Wits End, a Belgian Witbier; Cheap Date, an American Blonde ale; Dolce Vita, a Chocolate Hazelnut Sweet Stout; and Zeroday IPA, along with a menu of light fare.

According to Brandalynn, they're committed to utilizing Pennsylvania vendors for food and other products. As weather permits, the brewery plans to partner with area food trucks to provide additional selections during weekend hours. 

Meanwhile in Philadelphia, the University of the Sciences announced the launch of a Brewing Science Certificate for the fall semester.

The university says the program is an acknowledgement of the beer boom: America’s breweries account for over 110,000 jobs. According to the Brewers Association, about 1.5 breweries open every day in the U.S., with more than 150 in the mid-Atlantic region alone. In 2014, production of craft brews grew 18 percent by volume and 22 percent by sales.

The best positions in this growth industry often require formal training in brewing science. The post-baccalaureate, 18-credit certificate program delves deep into the biology, chemistry, physics and math of creating the perfect pint. The program can be completed full-time in one year, or part time in two, followed by an internship with a local brewery partner.

"Demand has never been greater for trained professionals with a passion for this extraordinary work," insists Dr. Peter B. Berget, chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at USciences.

Source: Brandalynn Armstrong, Zeroday Brewing Company and the University of the Sciences.
Writer: Elise Vider

Drexel and TechGirlz partner to teach game design to young women

Girls just want to have…parity in the tech world.

With the aim of addressing gender inequality in the sector, Drexel University’s Entrepreneurial Game Studio is working with the Philadelphia nonprofit TechGirlz to create a virtual game design class that will be made available, free-of-charge, to schools and students nationwide.

This set of self-contained, online instructional videos and educational materials will guide middle school and high-school-age students – and their teachers – through a basic game design curriculum. 
 
"Our goal is to give young women a little taste of game design," explains Frank Lee, an associate professor in Westphal College of Media Arts & Design and founder of the Entrepreneurial Game Studio. "Many of them are already playing video games, but we’re hoping our workshops will inspire them to ask questions about how they’re made, and think about how they could make them better. We want to make a program that is useful and engaging enough that students will get enough basic coding knowledge to make a simple game."

"Our goal for this program is to make sure girls understand what technology is all about and how they can be part of it," adds Tracey Welson Rossman, founder of TechGirlz. "This particular program is targeted to increase the number of girls who understand how cool creating games can be."

Participants in TechGirlz’ ongoing workshops and summer programs are currently testing the game design curriculum for an anticipated fall launch. According to Welson Rossman, the nonprofit is also planning to expand its workshop offerings nationwide. 

Source: Tracey Welson Rossman, TechGirlz and Drexel University
Writer: Elise Vider
 

TechCelerator @ State College wins $500K federal grant to turn ideas into businesses

As anyone who's ever tried to launch a tech startup knows, it takes a lot more than a good idea.

Penn State recently received a $500,000 federal grant to address just that challenge. The funds will advance the development of TechCelerator @ State College, a pre-accelerator specifically designed to allow technologists to explore entrepreneurship and commercialization pathways and arrive at educated go/no-go decisions. This program will not only result in $30 million in economic benefits, but will also catalyze a replicable rural innovation strategy.

"The TechCelerator Program, which has already produced dozens of success stories, provides an array of pre-launch business and market research services -- or Boot Camps -- designed to assist university researchers, grad students and local tech-entrepreneurs in converting their ideas into business realities," explained Stephen Brawley, president and CEO of Ben Franklin Technology Partners. "Our goal was to stimulate and ‘accelerate’ a sustainable, entrepreneurial pipeline and the model works." 

The grants from the U.S. Department of Commerce Regional Innovation Strategies program are part of a new initiative designed to advance innovation and capacity-building activities in regions across the country. TechCelerator @ State College is among the first 26 recipients.

"This region is fortunate to have a variety of assets, most notably in intellectual property creation from the cutting edge research conducted at the university," said Heather Fennessey, director of Penn State’s Small Business Development Center. "Penn State's research expenditures have increased by nearly $500 million in the past 20 years. The opportunity for our potential economic growth, which can result from this increase in university-based research, is exciting."

Source: Ben Franklin Technology Partners
Writer: Elise Vider
 

In Coplay, Baseball Info Systems brings technology to America's pastime

Baseball season is underway and Baseball Info Solutions (BIS) is in full swing.

Based in Coplay, BIS uses advanced technology to supply its clients -- 22 of the 30 Major League Baseball teams, plus sports agents, media (including ESPN), fantasy services, game companies and individual baseball junkies -- with intensive data and analytics.

The company's video scouts watch every baseball game twice to deliver customized data: hitting, pitching and fielding statistics; historical information; and analytics – defensive analysis of every player in the major leagues, tools to optimize infield and outfield defensive positioning, analysis of base running tendencies, etc. -- in multiple formats and in real time.

"We pride ourselves on being ahead of the curve on sabermetric [the mathematical and statistical analysis of baseball records] topics such as defensive metrics and, more recently, the rise of shift usage in baseball," explains BIS President Ben Jedlovec. (The shift is a realignment of infielders, intended to driver batters batty.)

"Each client uses the data a little differently," he adds, "from on-the-field players and coaches to front office personnel to individuals looking to get a leg up in their fantasy leagues."

The company’s roots go back to the mid-'80s, when owner John Dewan partnered with legendary baseball statistician Bill James on Project Scoresheet.

"Soon, that partnership progressed to STATS, Inc., where John became owner and CEO," says Jedlovec. "At STATS, John, Bill and others built a sports data collection company that revolutionized the sports industry. Shortly after John left STATS in 2001, he co-founded Baseball Info Solutions to take baseball data and analytics to the next level."

Today the company employs 17 full-timers -- many are former pro and collegiate ball players -- along with research, programming and database management experts, plus a number of seasonal video scouts.

"We're always looking for smart, tech-minded baseball fanatics to join our team," enthuses ?Jedlovec.

Source: Ben Jedlovec, Baseball Info Solutions
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Three tech startups get growing with help from BFTP/CNP

Three tech startups have received investments from Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Central and Northern Pennsylvania

Located in Harrisburg, Hatchback, Inc. has developed a B2B platform that integrates with mobile apps, allowing marketers to collect, target and engage with audiences based on their actual travel patterns. The company offers retailers, restaurants, etc., the ability to engage with consumers, creating sales opportunities that would otherwise likely not exist.   

"Power players like Google and Facebook rely on manual check-ins at Point A and Point B to learn about users," explains the company’s website. "Hatchback persistently gathers information about users' travel patterns to understand their tendencies, whereabouts and habits as consumers. In other words, Hatchback captures the invaluable moments happening between Point A and Point B that the 'big guys' simply don't access."

Atoptix, located in State College, is developing a smart-phone integrated health sensor. It offers individuals the ability to track and monitor their health and wellness by accurately measuring the levels of various tissue components such as hemoglobin, oxygen and glucose. The patented miniature optical spectrometer technology allows for completely non-invasive, real-time monitoring and early warning for health concerns such as anemia, diabetes, inflammation and even cancer. 

"Atoptix was formed to turn exciting technology developed by researchers at Penn State University into solutions that can have a meaningful and marketable impact outside of the research laboratory," says the company's website; the enterprise was recently awarded an SBIR Phase 1 grant by the National Institutes of Health.

In Boalsburg, Sensor Networks has developed a safe, patented digital solution for measuring and monitoring wall thickness in pipes, tanks, vessels and heat exchangers. This technology replaces the need to send technicians into physical locations such as refineries, chemical plants, rail and tank trucks, storage tanks and offshore drilling platforms. In February, the company was awarded a $50,000 grant from Ben Franklin’s Shale Gas Innovation and Commercialization Center. 

Source: BFTP/CNP
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Toothbrushes, Textiles, Technology: BFTP/NEP invests in 10 diverse companies

Three early-stage companies and seven established manufacturers in northeastern Pennsylvania are beneficiaries of the latest round of investments from Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania (BFTP/NEP). Those investments total $316,000.
 
Loans were provided to the following early-stage companies:
 
Bison Analytics, LLC, Lewisburg, was awarded $52,500 to complete development of and provide marketing support to their consolidation, planning and business intelligence software, targeted to small businesses that use QuickBooks
 
Colymer Industries, LLC, located at Ben Franklin TechVentures in Bethlehem, earned $50,000 to implement a marketing and sales strategy to commercialize a new proprietary, non-asphalt roofing and waterproofing material called Tarzanite.
 
Four Hound Solutions, LLC, Wilkes-Barre, received a loan of $25,000 to develop and submit a provisional patent and revise their business plan; the company produces software solutions for automated test equipment. 
 
BFTP/NEP will also provide matching funds for these technology-based manufacturing/university partnerships.
 
Applied Separations, Inc., Allentown, and Lafayette College received $50,000 to develop and implement a new process and deploy equipment for the waterless dyeing of textiles. They hope to tap into business-to-business sales to clothing manufacturers and textile companies.
 
Bio Med Sciences, Inc., Allentown, and Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center earned $25,000 to complete implementation of a new Enterprise Resource Planning system. The company produces innovative and specialized materials for burn and wound care, and aesthetic skin care. 

Effort Foundry, Inc., Bath, and Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center received $25,000 to implement improved production methods and product tracking capabilities at this supplier of high-integrity steel parts for the pump, power generation, and military industries.
 
Hydro Recovery LP, Blossburg, and Pennsylvania State University were awarded $25,000 to further develop and optimize the economic extraction of useful materials from residual "frac" water used in natural gas wells.
 
Pleasant Mount Welding, Inc., Carbondale, and Johnson College received $20,100 to develop manufacturing capability and produce aluminum I-bar and rectangular bar grating products to better serve customers, increase profit margin and create additional market opportunities. 

Radius Toothbrush, Kutztown, and Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center earned $18,500 to complete facility assessment and planning to accommodate future growth at this manufacturer of innovative, high-performance, ergonomic toothbrushes.
 
Rea.deeming Beauty, Inc., Bethlehem, and Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center were awarded $25,000 to streamline current manufacturing and shipping procedures by designing and implementing new automation techniques at this manufacturer of elliptical-shaped makeup applicators. 

Source: BFTP/NEP
Writer: Elise Vider
 

A cure for Alzheimer's? Penn State launches crowdfunding site to boost brain-repair research

A Penn State team has launched a crowdfunding campaign to support its promising research on brain repair.

"Our revolutionary technology holds promise as a potential treatment for many brain injuries and disorders," explains Gong Chen, a biology professor and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences, who heads the research. "We recently discovered a way to transform one type of a patient's own brain cells -- called glial cells -- into healthy, functioning nerve cells that can replace those damaged by Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, brain trauma, spinal-cord trauma or stroke. For the first time in history, our revolutionary technology now can reverse glial scars back into functional neural tissue inside the brain."

According to an article written by Penn State spokeswoman Barbara Kennedy and originally published in the Centre Daily Times, Chen’s team has published research describing its success: "Even in very old mice with Alzheimer’s disease, [they were] able to regenerate many functional neurons from the internal glial cells of these mice and to replenish the lost neurons in the brains of the mice. This research raises the hope that neural-replacement therapy might someday help human patients."

The new month-long crowdfunding campaign has a $50,000 goal and ends at the end of April. The money will allow the lab to purchase critical equipment and materials, and to proceed more quickly to clinical trials. 

"It will take at least an estimated $1 million per year to hire highly skilled people and to carry out vital tests on several specific disorders," says Chen. "With [funding] we can move our lab research to human clinical trials much faster, perhaps shortening the delivery of drug therapy to patients from 10 years to five years."

Source: Barbara Kennedy, Penn State University
Writer: Elise Vider

Wilkes Enterprise Center opens its doors to startups in downtown Wilkes-Barre

Wilkes University has expanded its entrepreneurial education offerings with the new Wilkes Enterprise Center, a downtown business incubator intended to encourage and support startups from Wilkes students, faculty and staff.  

According to a university blog post, nine nascent businesses are already housed at the center, which opened in March. Three are student-run enterprises: Kraken Boardsports, which manufactures outdoor recreation products; Magnesium Works, a company developing a therapeutic wrap for athletic and other applications; and Penwel, developers of a product to increase student safety at parties.

Other businesses run by Wilkes faculty and staff include Bepa Studio, a nature photography studio; Four Hound Solutions, which provides automated testing solutions (and is the recipient of a new investment, reported in this issue, from Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania); Penn Manufacturing, an additive manufacturing company; MC2 Consulting Group, which provides leadership training and consulting services; and Xonnel Enterprises, which designs and manufactures fitness equipment. A ninth company, At The Inkwell -- which specializes in book promotion and reviews in an online platform -- is not physically located at the center, but will use its support services.  

The new center is an integral part of Wilkes' vision to expand entrepreneurial education across academic disciplines, explains Wilkes University President Patrick F. Leahy.

"The Wilkes Enterprise Center strengthens our educational mission, providing opportunities for students to apply what they have learned to invent new products and processes and to build businesses," he said in a statement. "Students also benefit by working with faculty who will start businesses under the auspices of the center."

An initiative of the Allan P. Kirby Center for Free Enterprise and Entrepreneurship at Wilkes, the center also reflects the University’s commitment to the city by attracting new businesses to downtown and retaining talented individuals to work locally. 

Businesses at the center receive office space and advising from an executive-in-residence and a team of volunteer business advisors. Wilkes is also planning a seed venture fund and technology transfer office to further support fledgling businesses.

Source: Wilkes University
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Philadelphia's Pulse InfoFrame brings its cloud-based platform to patient care

Alice Solomon, senior director of Pulse InfoFrame, has some questions: "Is it a problem that Starbucks is using the latest in analytics to get you a better cup of coffee, but we aren’t doing it to save your life? Is it a problem that the oncologist treating your mother may be totally unaware of how other doctors around the country and around the world are successfully treating different types of cancer? Is it a problem that your doctor diagnoses high blood pressure, prescribes meds, and sends you on your way to change your diet and sedentary lifestyle? Yes, yes, yes."

Pulse, a health care technology startup at Philadelphia's University City Science Center Digital Health Accelerator, is aiming to solve those challenges with its clinical and research platform, providing data, management and integration systems targeted at the highly detailed requirements of medical specialists. Physicians, hospitals, researchers, and medical device and pharmaceutical companies can use the cloud-based platform to capture, organize, model, store and share detailed administrative and medical data with patients and other health care stakeholders. 

The company was founded in 2011 in Canada, where it is providing the platform for a national melanoma registry, and has an office in India. Pulse originally came to Philadelphia as a participant in the Canadian Technology Accelerator and is committed to launching its U.S. operations in the region. Pulse already has its local first client, Simon’s Fund, a Lafayette Hill-based nonprofit focused on research and awareness of sudden cardiac arrest and death in young athletes and children.

According to Solomon, electronic medical records "are administrative and billing tools…they were never intended to solve patient care problems. The Pulse platform focuses on improving patient care by looking at what we call ‘little data,’ which is customizing data collection to pull what is relevant to the clinician with the goal of solving real big questions. We support 22 diseases globally (including cancer, diabetes and heart disease), provide mobile access and promote patient engagement in their own health. We find out why things happen."

Source: Alice Solomon, Pulse InfoFrame
Writer: Elise Vider

Penn Medicine expands at newest University City Science Center building

The University City Science Center in West Philadelphia is now fully leased at its newest building at 3737 Market Street with the expansion of its anchor tenant.

Penn Medicine University City is expanding into an additional 56,000 square feet or two entire floors. With this lease expansion, Penn Medicine occupies almost 268,000 square feet in the 13-story laboratory and office building. 

"3737 Market’s rapid lease up exemplifies the attractiveness of the Science Center as a location of choice in the innovation ecosystem," insists Science Center President and CEO Stephen S. Tang. 

The new building has achieved LEED Gold certification for its core and shell design. The structure also incorporates innovative energy efficiency features, an extensive green roof system with a white roof membrane that helps reduce heat emissions from the building, and an innovative storm water management system. It is the first health care building in Pennsylvania to have a chilled beam system, an advanced convection HVAC system designed to heat or cool large structures. 

Wexford Science & Technology, a real estate company specializing in facilities for institutions such as universities, university-related research parks and health care systems, and the Science Center jointly developed the building, which opened in September.

According to its website, the Science Center now comprises 16 buildings across a 17-acre campus offering "both plug-and-play incubator space for startup companies and office and lab space for established companies."

Source: University City Science Center
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Architrep hatches DIY dinosaur kits in Allentown

At age five, Lisa Glover had a dinosaur-themed birthday party. Years later, inspired by a dinosaur-at-a-mall video, she went full Jurassic Park for an assignment at Lehigh University’s Technical Entrepreneurship Master’s Degree Program

"The dino kits were part of a homework assignment back in October of 2013 called 'Making It’ -- we had to explore a manufacturing process and demonstrate it in a unique and interesting way,” she recalls. “I chose a process called Industrial Origami, which involves taking sheet metal, making special types of cuts in it, and folding it up into various, useful objects. I thought that making something fanciful -- a costume -- would be a great use for this manufacturing process. I demonstrated it using cardboard, since sheet metal is really heavy! People really were fascinated by this 15-foot-long creation of mine, and I had a ton of fun building it, so I decided to bring a smaller version of the creature to life."

Last March, Glover hatched Architrep at Ben Franklin Tech Ventures. Soon after, she launched a flat-pack Velociraptor kit on the crowdfunding site Kickstarter. She expected to raise enough funds to make and sell a few hundred kits. Instead, she sold nearly 5,500. In December, Architrep was accepted into the Bridgeworks Enterprise Center business incubation program. 

The startup's latest product, a Pterodactyl kit with a three-foot wingspan and Glover’s signature googly eyes, has already exceeded its Kickstarter goal. Glover also has plans for a Triceratops kit, as well as a variety of other dinosaurs, animals and mythical creatures. 

"I'm also developing some mini kits of the same creatures," she says. "The current kits take a few hours to build and are intended for ages 9-plus. I'd like to create some simpler ones that can be built by ages 6-plus and only take half-an-hour to build. Also, I'm developing partial-costumes: just the head and arms of creatures, that people can build and wear. Some day, I hope to bring full-body costumes to the world, but right now that just isn't feasible." 

Source: Lisa Glover, Architrep
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Helping companies train their people, TiER1 expands in Pittsburgh

Founded in 2002 in a Kentucky home dining room, TiER1 Performance Solutions is now growing fast in Pittsburgh. 

The company, based in Kentucky near Cincinnati, opened an office in Wexford in 2010 when it acquired Motionplan, a custom training development company. By 2014, TiER1 had 25 employees in Wexford and had outgrown its space. Rather than relocate, the company chose to open a second location in downtown Pittsburgh. 

"Opening a second, centrally located office is part of our plan to further embed ourselves into the fabric of Pittsburgh," said CEP Greg Harmeyer last year. "It’s a creative space where our team, clients and partners can connect and collaborate around ideas that empower people to do their best work."

"We’ve doubled in size in the last three years, and plan to double our Pittsburgh team size and revenue presence over the next few years, as well," says spokeswoman Abby Bolton. The company counts more than 40 large companies in the Pittsburgh region as clients, along with hundreds more around the country, as well as federal and local governments. 

TiER1 helps "mid- to large-sized organizations improve their performance by improving the performance of their people," she explains. "We design and develop learning, communication and change management solutions to help align, train and enable people to do their best work. Whether we’re partnering with a client to support a new technology rollout, design a global onboarding program, launch a new product, develop an enterprise learning strategy, or evolve an organizational culture -- if it has to do with people and performance, TiER1 can help.”

Source: Abby Bolton, TiER1 Performance Solutions
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Philadelphia's BioBots prints living tissue

In the sounds-like-science-fiction department comes BioBots, a Philadelphia startup developing high-resolution, desktop 3D printers that generate living tissue.

"BioBots is like a 3D printer, but instead of using plastic filament to create 3D structures, it uses mixtures of biocompatible materials (like collagen) and living cells to create 3D tissues," explains CEO Danny Cabrera. "The finished product that comes out of the BioBot is alive."

The first-generation BioBots 1 printer can generate a dozen different cell types. 
  
With over 120,000 patients in the United States on organ-transfer waiting lists, building replacement organs is a long-term goal for the company. For now, the printers are primarily used for research.

"Biofabrication technology is definitely becoming more and more accessible in functionality, ease of use and cost, and that is going to greatly accelerate the pace of development," says Cabrera. "We are currently focusing on making the best research tool for our customers, taking structures out of lab note books and onto lab benches. It’s only a matter of time before those same structures start leaking out of the lab and into the clinic." 

Co-founder Ricardo Solorzano started working on printing 3D tissues -- and built the first prototype -- in his University of Pennsylvania dorm room. In August, he and Penn classmates Cabrera and Sohaib Hashmi launched the company. The startup initially grew at the DreamIt Health incubator and recently received funding from Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania

BiotBots is also opening a seed round of funding; actively promoting its beta program; offering testers a bioprinter and support for $5,000; and recruiting for its R&D team.

"The BioBot 1 is exciting, but it’s definitely not all we have up our sleeves," insists Cabrera. "Look out for a radical change in a few healthcare-related industries and new industries being created by our technology."

Source: Danny Cabrera, BioBots
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Whitehall's Dynalene helps industry keep its cool

Even in the coldest of winters, industrial processes generate a lot of heat  -- and that's not a good thing.

Dynalene, headquartered in Whitehall, specializes in industrial heat transfer fluids or, as president and CEO Satish Mohapatra explains, "something that carries heat from one place to another, similar to the antifreeze in your car engine."

The company's products are used in a wide range of applications: pharmaceutical (reactor cooling), food and beverage process cooling, climactic chambers (wind tunnels), ice rinks, heating and air-conditioning of buildings, solar thermal and electronics cooling.

Dynalene's roots go back to a 1993 research grant from Ben Franklin Technology Partners that went towards development of ultra-low temperature heat transfer fluids that work efficiently below -80°C (-112°F). The resulting products were commercialized and sold under the Dynalene name by several antecedent corporations until 2005 when the company changed its name to Dynalene Inc. 

Today, the enterprise has more than 50 products, offers a wide range of analytical testing through its laboratory services division, and fields an active R&D group.  
 
"Looking ahead, we are developing several products to go into solar thermal, fuel-cell cooling and flushing fluid applications," adds Mohapatra.

Dynalene works closely with Lehigh University and has won a number of grants from the federal Small Business Innovation Research program and the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Technology Alliance.  

The company made its first expansion in 2013 with a new production facility in Chicago to serve midwest customers and is currently planning another such facility in the west.

Source: Satish Mohapatra, Dynalene
Writer: Elise Vider
 

Pittsburgh startup NetBeez monitors networks in real time

The enterprise networks that healthcare organizations, university campuses and big retailers rely upon are complex and notoriously difficult to build, operate, monitor and troubleshoot.

Pittsburgh's NetBeez has developed a network-monitoring tool that tests and validates enterprise networks from an end-user perspective. The company uses small and low-cost sensors to verify that users can connect to the network and have good performance from the applications. Data is collected in real-time. When a problem occurs in the network, it is immediately detected and reported to the network support group so it can be corrected before users have to call the help desk.

Stefano Gridelli, Panickos Neophytou and Panos Vouzis founded the company in 2013 at Innovation Work's AlphaLab incubator. Neophytou is credited as the main developer of the central server that provides the "swarm intelligence" of the system. Vouzis developed the network sensors -- called BEEZ -- that collect and process network and application performance.

"The solution can be deployed in any network environment: from small remote offices to large corporate locations, from data centers to cloud environments," explains Gridelli. "The development team puts considerable effort into making the solution easy to use and deploy so our customers can start monitoring with NetBeez from day one, without requiring too much effort, skill or training for its adoption."

NetBeez recently released new wireless monitoring agents -- "a killer product that is [generating] strong demand from universities and from retail customers," says Gridelli -- and will be showcasing its wares next month at Interop Las Vegas, a mega IT industry event. 

Since its founding, NetBeez has received funding from Carnegie Mellon University’s Open Field Entrepreneurs Fund, the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development and Innovation Works via the Technology Commercialization Initiative.

"Without their support and the ecosystem that is taking place in Pittsburgh, it would have been almost impossible for the founding team to [achieve] such accomplishment in two years only," insists Gridelli.

Source: Stefano Gridelli, NetBeez
Writer: Elise Vider
 
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